Question about sticks...

Discussion in 'Home Builders and Sport Pilots' started by azpilot, Oct 13, 2021.

  1. azpilot

    azpilot Line Up and Wait

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    I'm trying to put my long term aviation plan together, and I think it involves an RV-10. I think I'd really enjoy building one, and in a few years the timing will be right to start. There is just one small problem, I don't think I'll like a control stick rather than a yoke. For those of you that fly a Vans with a control stick or anything else with a control stick, how do you like it compared to a yoke or a side stick? Just curious.

    A friend of mine is building an RV-7. Hopefully I can get some right seat time in it when he is done and maybe I'll change my mind. Just looking for feedback. Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Greg Bockelman

    Greg Bockelman Touchdown! Greaser!

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    It’s not that big a deal. Find someone that has one and get a ride. You’ll figure it out in a matter of minutes.
     
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  3. Michael Cutler

    Michael Cutler Pre-Flight

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    I've often wondered the same thing, so here's my anecdotal answer. 100% of my time has been in 172s of varying models, but last week, I got to go up in a Glasair Sportsman with a friend. He let me take the controls for a little bit while in cruise and it was surprisingly easier than I thought. Had it not been for a pretty stout crosswind, I think I would have felt more comfortable with the stick than a yoke. Granted I didn't do any TOs or landings, but the controls seemed quite intuitive. Not sure it's apples to apples, but I think it would be a fairly easy transition based on those few minutes.
     
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  4. X3 Skier

    X3 Skier En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Fighter Pilots use sticks. Trash Haulers use yokes.:D

    Been there, done both. Only thing I don’t really like is a side stick.

    Not a big deal except remembering where the PTT, Trim button and other things are.

    Cheers
     
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  5. bflynn

    bflynn Final Approach

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    Even a side stick becomes normal in an hour or two and you stop thinking about it. You will get the feel of a stick quickly.

    of course, it IS an experimental. You’re free to design your own flight controls.
     
  6. Craig

    Craig Line Up and Wait

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    Flown both over the years. For A to B cruising in a spam can, yokes are fine. For wringing performance out of a bird, stick feels much better.
     
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  7. Capt. Geoffrey Thorpe

    Capt. Geoffrey Thorpe Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    Why?

    Current ride is a stick, works for me. If you get in through a door, it gets in the way, but with a sliding canopy, not an issue. I made the passenger side stick removable to make it easier for my daughter to get in and out - she has no interest in flying the airplane, so no need for it on that side when she is along.
     
  8. donjohnston

    donjohnston Cleared for Takeoff

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    I went from a 182RG with a yoke to a Velocity with a stick (on the keel so effectively a side stick). Took all of two minutes to be second nature. I liked it MUCH better than the yoke.
     
  9. tsts4

    tsts4 Cleared for Takeoff

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    I too was concerned about the transition from yoke (99% of my time was in in Cessna 152s and 172s at that point) to a stick. However, I was even more concerned about moving to a castoring nose wheel and differential braking than the stick thing. In the end, both were complete non-issues taking about all of 2 minutes during my RV-10 transition training to get used to each.
     
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  10. midlifeflyer

    midlifeflyer Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Personally, I found the difference to be irrelevant with an 8-10 second learning curve after which you don't even think about it. That's also been my experience teaching transitioning pilots.

    Single biggest "downside" :fcross::biggrin::fcross: to a stick? No yoke mount for a tablet or phone.
     
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  11. FORANE

    FORANE En-Route

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    Stick is easier. With a yoke you have to suspend your hand mid-air in level flight which tires the arm. With a stick you can rest your arm on your thigh and simply hold the stick neutral with thumb and index finger.
     
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  12. tsts4

    tsts4 Cleared for Takeoff

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    This. Plus it takes up lap space for a large tablet, or lapboard, etc. I use an iPad mini which sits just fine on my thigh so it's not a big deal. None of these things are show stoppers in the 10 due to the shear size of the cockpit. You have a good 6" between the front seats where the "tunnel" runs making a large shelf to place things within easy reach.
     
  13. azpilot

    azpilot Line Up and Wait

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    Oh, that's a really good idea!
     
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  14. jsstevens

    jsstevens Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    I took a demo flight in an Evektor Sportstar several years ago. I told the demo pilot that it was 1) my first time flying off grass and 2) my first time flying with a stick. He told me the grass would take about 30 seconds to get used to and the stick half that. As near as I could tell, he was right.

    One additional point, last spring I did an accelerated IR flying a DA-40NG. It has a very short stick. I have more than 300 hours in various C-172s. The big transition was that I needed to hold the stick between my thumb and index finger and rest my hand on my thigh to keep from GROSSLY over controlling the plane. But that is the difference in responsiveness, not the stick.
     
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  15. steingar

    steingar Taxi to Parking

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    I've flown stick, in a Vans no less. Non issue. Only problem with a stick is getting in and out (which is why they switched to yokes).
     
  16. tsts4

    tsts4 Cleared for Takeoff

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    The sticks really don’t represent an issue getting in and out of a 10, which is the plane in question.
     
  17. ebetancourt

    ebetancourt Line Up and Wait

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    Fact is, airplanes with high workloads intended for single pilot operation have sticks. Wonder why?
     
  18. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    Skycatcher has a 'stoke'. I flew one of those for a while, I liked it. Its kinda like a stick that's bent and then goes forward under the panel so its easy to get in and out.

    upload_2021-10-13_19-3-11.png
     
  19. nauga

    nauga Administrator Management Council Member PoA Supporter

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    While there is something to what you posted, yoke-equipped airplanes are perfectly capable of some pretty high workload tasks with a single pilot on the yoke, cf. E-2's landing aboard ship and now aerial refueling, B-52's and C-5's et al. aerial refueling. For the typical GA workload like in an RV-10 either a yoke or a stick is appropriate, and from personal experience one can quickly get used to a stick in the right or left hand, or a yoke in either hand. Sidesticks are probably similar but my experience with *good* sidesticks in either hand is limited to simulators.

    Stokes OTOH are an abomination and an affront to control harmony. :D

    Nauga,
    sticky
     
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  20. Dana

    Dana Pattern Altitude

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    My impression is that pilots who enjoy flying for the sake of flying prefer sticks, while pilots who fly primarily to get somewhere prefer yokes or don't care. Me, I'm firmly in the former group. I learned to fly in a C-150 but it took me about thirty seconds to be comfortable with a stick (though years of R/C flying probably helped).

    I like sidesticks too, had one in my Kolb, but I recognize they can be problematic if you need to switch hands to work the radios or something. I presume Cirrus drivers just use the autopilot.
     
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  21. catmandu

    catmandu Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    I went from single seat stick flying to right seat Cessna 172 yoke flying. I am still alive. YMMV.

    I am back to mostly stick flying, because my selected Deity says it is proper. And about to go back to thrust levers on the left, the way my Deity says it should be.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2021
  22. DaleB

    DaleB Final Approach

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    I did all of my training in yoke equipped spam cans. Switching to a stick took about... well... essentially no time. Well, I was also going from a 172 to an RV-12, so there was also the change from "one hand" to "two fingers". Not a difficult transition. Steam to glass took longer, it was a couple of hours before looking at the tapes and all came naturally.
     
  23. nauga

    nauga Administrator Management Council Member PoA Supporter

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    Do tell...:cool:

    Nauga,
    intrigued by plurality
     
  24. catmandu

    catmandu Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    Not as sexy as one might hope: RV6-a to RV-8 as our every day steed.

    But, a Super-8. So, thrust to weight mo' betta', for, you know, climbs in the Sierra's. :)
     
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  25. sarangan

    sarangan Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    Yep, stick vs yoke does not make much difference.
    The yoke may be more convenient for mounting for a tablet, but the stick has a slightly better panel visibility. Again, not a significant difference in the grand scheme of things.
     
  26. wanttaja

    wanttaja En-Route

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    Planes like the P-38?
    [​IMG]
    Years ago, I led a team of fellow CAP cadets in restoring a WWII Link Trainer. It could be switched from yoke to stick. Trouble was, with the stick in place, the ailerons got real heavy. Needed the gearing in the yoke setup.

    Ron Wanttaja
     
  27. Mason

    Mason Pattern Altitude

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  28. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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    I have a Cessna and a Cub and go back and forth without any problems. My take on it is that I prefer a stick when sitting on the aircraft centerline and a yoke when I’m in the left seat.
     
  29. Rockymountain

    Rockymountain Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Sticks give you more control, faster response and in unpowered controls more leverage. Just more performance and feel. Front yokes are second best for performance, followed by side yokes which give the least performance and rely on some of the weakest muscles in your arms. As far as convenience, side yokes and side sticks give the most room, followed by center yokes followed by sticks. Performance go stick. Cross country on autopilot go side yoke or side stick. Best or worst of both worlds yoke. Can’t beat a stick for feel and performance though.
     
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  30. Stan Cooper

    Stan Cooper Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    In 1964 I learned to fly in a C150 (control wheel) at the Vandenberg AFB Aero Club. The club had two T-34A Beech Mentors just out of USAF inventory, and I transitioned to them (stick). I currently fly an LSA with a stick, and am equally comfortable with either a control wheel or stick, though I actually prefer a stick these days even for hand flying long cross-country flights.
     
  31. Daleandee

    Daleandee Pattern Altitude

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    I've flown yoke but I like my stick with my rudder ... :D
     
  32. Lndwarrior

    Lndwarrior Line Up and Wait

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    I had the same concern when building my Zenith. My first flight was surprising in that, instead of consciously moving a yolk, it felt more like I was just thinking where I wanted the plane to go, and it went there. I flew nothing but yolks for more than 20 years, but the transition to a stick was an instantaneous and positive transition. I immediately appreciated the difference. It's much better in my opinion.
     
  33. BladeSlap

    BladeSlap Pre-takeoff checklist

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    You like experimentals?

    you like sticks?

    you like performance?

     
  34. Dana

    Dana Pattern Altitude

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    I've flown yokes but I don't think I've ever flown a yolk...
     
  35. Mikey B

    Mikey B Pre-Flight

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    When I think of what you can do with a stick, I think of this:

    I'm sure there are even better examples, but wow.
     
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  36. Daleandee

    Daleandee Pattern Altitude

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    Seen that before and she is absolutely mesmerizing. So cool and smooth throughout the entire routine.
     
  37. Boundary Waters

    Boundary Waters Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Build an Aeronca C-3. One stick... right in between youse when carrying two people. If the sole occupant, you sit in the middle of the bench seat... Triple width outer rudder tubes (not really pedals), and real skinny inner ones to accommodate.
     
  38. pfarber

    pfarber Pre-takeoff checklist

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    My mission is long xc... 3+ hours. I dont see a stick as comfortable for stretching out or even just readjusting my position in the seat without bumping the controls.

    A yoke is out of the way of my moving around.

    How is using a porta poty with a stick???
     
  39. RussR

    RussR Pattern Altitude

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    Dang you beat me to it as I was reading through the thread. On a XC flight I do like to stretch out. Hard with the stick there. Might want to eat lunch. Possible, of course, but it takes up lap space where I might put my lunch.

    As a CFI, I find sticks inconvenient for CFI-ing. I will usually have the syllabus out and on my lap to take notes during the flight. Can't really do that with a stick, no lap space.
     
  40. tsts4

    tsts4 Cleared for Takeoff

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    It is easier to shift leg position with a yoke, but you get used to it. As far as ease of using a piddle pack, IMO same thing. I do try to limit my enroute legs to 3ish hrs mainly because my wife and I prefer not to use on-board relief unless it's an emergency and it also gives us an opportunity to get out and stretch.