possible bipolar and sport pilot?

Discussion in 'Medical Topics' started by Unregistered, Apr 18, 2013.

  1. doug rooney

    doug rooney Filing Flight Plan

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    Most informative guys. I will write the Secretary!
     
  2. doug rooney

    doug rooney Filing Flight Plan

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    Would love to hear from Dr. Chen???
     
  3. poadeleted20

    poadeleted20 Deleted

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    Then you'll have to go elsewhere, as he no longer visits here. Try the AOPA Forums or his web site.
     
  4. doug rooney

    doug rooney Filing Flight Plan

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  5. bobcat

    bobcat Guest

    The same could be said with heart disease or diabetes or many other diseases that require medication to maintain health. As a CFII I have taught more than a few students who have "grounding" conditions that are flying because of a successful appeal.

    In other words, never say never.
     
  6. azure

    azure Final Approach

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    Define "appeal". Do you mean that they applied for and were granted an SI, or that they were denied and appealed the denial?

    And the FAA's argument is that in the case of bipolar and some other psychiatric conditions, the disease directly affects the decision-making center in the brain. That is not true of most other "grounding" conditions.

    But generally, I agree with you. No one has control over whether someone else takes their medication for ANY condition on any particular day, and many factors can go into a person's decision. But I'm not FAA (or even an AME). Bruce is the person who could explain their reasoning more fully.