I need some advice...

Discussion in 'Aerobatics' started by Mavalathon, Jan 1, 2023.

  1. RoscoeT

    RoscoeT Pattern Altitude

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    In a perfect world I agree. But like mandatory spin training IMO it's just not practical to implement safely and cost effectively. Too few qualified airplanes and instructors. I credit the OP for being interested and doing it. And for the naysayers, do it while you have the time, money, and inspiration. You never know. The OP will for sure not end up like so many pilots who are scared of stalls, spins, "steep" bank angles, and who skid base to final turns, and just fearfully operate in a very narrow performance zone because of their limited experience and fear the unknown.
     
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  2. PaulS

    PaulS Touchdown! Greaser!

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    My neighbor's son is a relatively new F 18 pilot for the Navy. He was top of his class in high school, needed a congressman's recommendation to get into the academy. Finished the academy at or near the top of his class. Got into flight training, passed all the physical requirements, finished his flight training in the top two of that class. Now he flies those magnificent machines. But my point is he went through a lot to get there, is super intelligent and in top physical and mental shape. They absolutely weed out weaker candidates. Personally, I don't think flight schools should work to this level. Safe and competent is the standard they should use.

    Roscoe T, you continue to ignore the context of the original post, which either intentionally or unintentionally implied that the OP was flying only once every 4 to 5 weeks due to financial constraints. She is talking about stuff that will not help her attain her goal of becoming private pilot. Someone, who, at least from the context of the OP before it was edited, had limited resources. Telling her to forget that stuff until after was good advice for her situation.

    Furthermore, implying that pilots who did not get spin training and aerobatic training before their ppl are lacking in skills is utter BS. A competent pilot candidate will not be afraid of stalls, does not skid through turns or fear the unknown. I actually believe it to be the opposite. There are people doing their training in high performance GA airplanes where it is more difficult for a student to explore edges of the envelope. In the case of the SR22, recovery from a spin is pull the chute immediately. That is in the back of the instructor's head when instructing stalls. Things like managing a $60,000 engine get in the way of doing some maneuvers. Coming over the fence at 80 knots instead of 55 knots give a lot less time learn the flare, resulting in more repetitions required. There are so many unnecessary impediments. If you have the money and want to do it that way, have at it.

    I stand by my advice to her. Get your private pilot certificate first, tailwheel or training wheel up front, doesn't really matter. But focus on the PP, after you get the certificate, do an aerobatic training course right away.

    We lose too many candidates who get discouraged at the time and investment required to get the pp certificate. Giving them advice to streamline that process is not 'naysaying'.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2023
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  3. RoscoeT

    RoscoeT Pattern Altitude

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    Not ignoring anything. I just happen to actually have a lot of perspective on aerobatic training and it just doesn't take very long. You can also choose how far you want to take it. Slipping in some acro time here and there isn't going to make any difference, which is what YOU are ignoring.

    Too much mother hen patrolling going on here. Nobody NEEDS a PPL. It's all for fun and experience. I'd bet if the OP was attempting the most economical and fast track to a flying job, she'd be taking a different route.

    I did not say nor mean to imply that it should be done before the PPL. But it's not BS to say that this training addresses the issues I described.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2023
  4. Pinecone

    Pinecone Pattern Altitude

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    But there are also transport and tanker and bomber pilots. Not much aerobatics in them. :)
     
  5. Pinecone

    Pinecone Pattern Altitude

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    Sorry, but I disagree. Most pilots DO lack a lot of flying skills. Just like most drivers lack a lot of driving skills.

    For 99.9% of flying or driving, that is not a big deal. But at times it is a big deal.

    A friend of mine is alive because of the skills I taught him that included basic aerobatics. I am alive due to being taught those same skills not long after my PPL.

    I also teach high performance driving at a local track. And see similar things.
     
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  6. Ed Haywood

    Ed Haywood Pattern Altitude

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    Perfectly put.

    A couple hours of acro during PPL is a great thing. Will make you a much better pilot in so many ways. But there are diminishing returns, and you run the risk of being distracted from the training tasks needed to complete your ticket. Now that the OP has scratched that itch, IMO better to focus on PPL, get that in the bag, then do the fun stuff.
     
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  7. iamtheari

    iamtheari Administrator Management Council Member PoA Supporter

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    You have too many goals and not enough resources. That’s true of most humans. You just need to prioritize how you allocate the resources to accomplish the goals.

    Goal 1: Get your PPL. Having the certificate will free up a lot of your resources (time, mind, and money) for your other goals.

    Goal 2: Buy a tail wheel airplane, probably one that is capable of Sportsman or maybe Intermediate aerobatics. You can work on this while you’re training and maybe even take your PPL check ride in your very own airplane. But assuming your primary training is in a more common modern trainer like a 172 or PA-28, you should stick with that if for no other reason than that you will have an easier time getting an examiner to do the check ride in a side-by-side plane than a tandem seating plane.

    Goal 3: Learn how to fly aerobatics. Until you have your PPL and plane, this will take resources away from those two goals. I would not dedicate any resources here until you accomplish at least the PPL. This goal will be much easier to accomplish with the PPL and your own plane. You can learn the basics with an instructor in a rental, but you will struggle to get much practice compared with flying your own plane solo.
     
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