G1000 training materials/methods

Discussion in 'Cleared for the Approach' started by tonycondon, Mar 24, 2008.

  1. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

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    Just got a call from a local doctor with a new 172 and G1000 panel. He wants to start his instrument training. Time for me to join the 21st century and get up to snuff on this stuff. My only appreciable G1000 time was in a 182 last year at Chips BBQ. Not really much to speak of. I am pretty fluent in the Garmin knobology, and can punch out the basics on the 430/530. For those of you out there teaching in glass, how is your training syllabus adjusted for use in the G1000 cockpit vs. regular steam gauges? What do I need to know before next monday?
     
  2. redcloud

    redcloud Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Tony:

    Cessna Pilot Centers have a very useful and complete computer-based, interactive CD Kit. It is done by the Kings, but those who have used it seem to like it in its thoroughness. I could ship it to you, the cost is $195.00. There are cheaper resources available through Sportys etc.; this one is based on the 172 G1000 and its actual integration with other systems such as the AP, detc.

    Scott
     
  3. HPNPilot1200

    HPNPilot1200 En-Route

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    I would highly recommend the Cessna Garmin G1000 Simulator sold directly by Garmin for around $30. If you know how to work a GNS430/530, the G1000 is a piece of cake, but takes time fiddling with the knobs. The sim. software sold by Garmin allows you to do just that on the computer.

    I taught myself how to use the whole system solely via the Garmin G1000 simulator and reading up on the G1000 manual, having been well versed in using the 430/530.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    Second both of these recommendations. The CPC course and syllabus is very good, and the SIM is a must - we have one at our flight school on a big 60" plasma screen and teach group classes and let folks use the sim for a nominal fee.

    You can learn so much more in the sim where you can pull the throttle back and essentially hover at 0 KIAS while you work out what you need to do, and you don't have to look for traffic - For IFR training it's even more valuable when you get into the procedures side of things.

    Also, I've heard really good stuff about Max Trescotts guides on the subject to recommend for your student as supplemental material.

    Remember, you don't have to be an expert, just far enough ahead of your student!
     
  5. flyingcheesehead

    flyingcheesehead Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Tony,

    Start here:
    Guide for DPE's and CFI's
    Training Guide - Instructor's Reference

    You might want to ask the good doctor if you can borrow his bird. What got me really comfortable with the G1000 was going on a cross country and playing with it. Start with the sim, of course, but IMHO nothing beats actually using it in the plane.

    You'll probably need to do the manila folder cutout thing to do partial panel most of the time, as Cessna doesn't like you using the breakers (which IMHO is pretty much BS).

    More later, when my brain is working. Ugh.
     
  6. CJones

    CJones Final Approach

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    I think this is a GREAT idea, Tony. And since you will be busy piddling with knobs and buttons, you will need a safety pilot to come along. Oh look, I have a pretty open schedule these days. How convenient! ;)
     
  7. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    Call Garmin - I was told that they now have cutouts that hang over the knobs and allow you to simulate certain failures, like an AHARS or an ADC failure, or even a clogged pitot. It lets the other areas remain transparent and functional. If they aren't Garmin products, they'll probably know who makes them.
     
  8. KennyFlys

    KennyFlys Guest

    Quite honestly, the King G1000 training software sucks. I took very little away from it; particularly considering its cost of $199 I paid. Now, it's $249. That's such a waste in my opinion considering how well many other King products are done.

    The Trescott book and software are great. For those interested, I can get them wholesale and will gladly pass them on at cost plus shipping. Ironically, I had just looked this up today for someone else.

    The book is normally $35 and available for $23.
    The software is normally $100 and available for $60.
    Shipping would be around $15. If you're interested, PM me.

    This is strictly for PoA members. I'm not asking for anything for myself. If so inspired, add a few bucks and I'll pass it along to that guy who has the chipmunk in his avatar. :)

    The Garmin simulator is great. Go for that to study. It's even better if you can use it on a twin-screen system.

    Fortunately, I have the luxury of practicing on the G1000 set up in a huge BE-58 simulator. But, I think ours cost around $300,000. That's out of the price range of most folks here. :)
     
  9. jdwatson

    jdwatson Line Up and Wait

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    I used the Garmin syllabuses (syllabi ?) and the Garmin 1000 Sim (V6.01) at first. Then followed up with Max's book. I presume Max's software would be as good as his book. Our local flight school is almost all glass now. I was running out of planes to rent that were round-gauges. In the end, it saved me several hundred in training/rentals. I did one VFR flight and one IFR (very close to an IPC) flight. The flight school usually does 2 VFR and 3 IFR to be checked out in the G1000s. This is one case where the SIMs and the homework really paid back dividends.
     
  10. write-stuff

    write-stuff En-Route

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    For reading, Max Trescott's G1000 book can't be beat. I'd say that it has become the de facto standard. For transition training prior to getting inside the airplane give Gold Seal's G1000 online course a try at www.Garmin1000.com.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  11. TangoWhiskey

    TangoWhiskey Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Necropost!
     
  12. ajstoner21

    ajstoner21 Cleared for Takeoff

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    :yeahthat:
     
  13. kontiki

    kontiki Cleared for Takeoff

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    Great thread!

    I downloaded the Pilots handbook and was going to take a crack at that in conjunstion with the Microsoft G1000, but after looking at these posts, it sounds like there is a better way.

    To a degree, time is more important to me than money, I only have the weekends and very tired week nights to grow new skills in.

    I do hope to be renting a local G1000 182 for future cross country trips.
     
  14. jmcsherry

    jmcsherry Pre-Flight

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    Tony -

    Trescott's book is good reading, but makes more sense if you ahve a little time behind the panel. At least, it did for me. I wish I had those links before I did my first G100 instructional flight. But a smart guy like you, with good 430 experience, can suss out most of the functions fairly easily.

    Have the good doctor study hard about the buttonology,and concentrate on teaching him good IR skills. The procedures are the same, you just have to send your gaze to a different spot to get the needed information.

    And Sportys sells some nifty static-cling covers that can simulate instrument failure. Even have red X's on them. http://www.sportys.com/PilotShop/product/9368 You can probably do more realistic failures on a good sim, but I don't have one available.
     
  15. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

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    heh, i never did fly with that guy.
     
  16. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    I got a copy of Rod Machado's Instrument Pilot Survival Guide, and had Rod sign it, at OSH.

    I'm pretty pleased with it. It's not a book for the beginning instrument student, but there's a lot of stuff in there about scanning and TAA that will be useful to me to dole out as tips/tricks to my instrument students along the way.
     
  17. Richard

    Richard Final Approach

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    Ack...city life
    I was going to congratulate Tony for mostly avoiding glass. :)
     
  18. JeffDG

    JeffDG Touchdown! Greaser!

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    I just did a G1000 transition course, and the instructor made us sit in the plane (with a power pack) instead of the sim.

    He said that when he transitioned, the simulator set him back a lot, because you spend more time figuring out how to make the mouse do what your hand would do than getting a feel for where stuff is.
     
  19. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    You certainly need "touchy-feely" time. But by using the sim first, then some time with external power, then actual flight, we've seen a reduction in the amount of actual instructor-led training required by about 40%, compared to doing it all with external power or in flight. This saves the student $$$.

    That, of course, is for students who are motivated and will learn independently.
     
  20. JeffDG

    JeffDG Touchdown! Greaser!

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    The big difference I found looking at the sim was trying to integrate the PFD and MFD information...I had to keep switching back and forth and not getting the whole picture.

    Even the "knobology" was funky...in the plane I tended to use the right-side PFD and left side MFD buttons most of the time, instead of using the left side PFD buttons, and the sim doesn't really let you do that at all.
     
  21. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    There's a dual screen mode in the sim that lets you put both up at the same time... Fixes the issues you mention, but does require a widescreen display for best effect.
     
  22. TangoWhiskey

    TangoWhiskey Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Biggest user interface oops on the G1000 is putting the BARO knob colocated with the CRS knob. Really easy to accidentally change your Baro setting unintentionally. And you can't press Ctrl-Z to undo... it's put me the habit of writing down altimeter settings as I receive them, THEN dialing them in, so I always have the last one written down to go back to.
     
  23. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    Tony, don't you set your standby altimeter? I agree with you that the BARO setting needs another solution, but if you set the G1000 first you can always go look back at the standby altimeter.
     
  24. TangoWhiskey

    TangoWhiskey Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Ha, good point, and yes, I do... in three places on the non GFC700 aircraft: G1000, KAP140 A/P and on the standby altimeter.

    And the name is TROY. :wink2:
     
  25. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    D'Oh!!!!