FIKI FL to NY?

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by DVSKY, Nov 5, 2021.

  1. DVSKY

    DVSKY Filing Flight Plan

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    So I was planning to purchase a Cessna TTx but I actually found a really nice Columbia 400 that I plan to buy. Those that have my read my posts know that I am just a student pilot and this plane will be for after my PPL for fun and to IFR train...

    Anyway, although I fly often to NJ for business, I go every 6 months or so to NY to visit family. Usually in December/January and July. I was wondering if I could make the trip to NY in December/January without FIKI in Columbia?

    I know its not needed but I am curious about experienced pilots thoughts on FL to NY once a year in the dead of winter without anti-ice. I wouldnt have "get there-itis" or whatever. I am self employed so if I have to leave later/earlier its not a problem.
     
  2. dans2992

    dans2992 En-Route PoA Supporter

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    If you’re flexible with timing, shouldn’t be a problem.
     
  3. dans2992

    dans2992 En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Also, learn about Skew-T charts and how to read them.
     
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  4. MonkeyClaw

    MonkeyClaw Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I flew without FIKI for years in the North East without issue. You need to be a little flexible with your timing but it was never an issue. I think a day early or late was the worst.
     
  5. RudyP

    RudyP Cleared for Takeoff

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    It will work out 95% of the time but the 5% may bug you. That said, as long as you can have some flexibility *if* you need it as people pointed out above, you'll be fine.
     
  6. RudyP

    RudyP Cleared for Takeoff

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    I used to do that trip pretty frequently (and others in the NE and Midwest) with a non-FIKI, basic TKS SR22 and even though I never canceled and very rarely adjusted trips, I eventually upgraded to FIKI because I wanted to be able to reduce the number of instances where I would have to get flexible. It all comes down to your schedule and mental flexibility.
     
  7. iamtheari

    iamtheari Administrator Management Council Member PoA Supporter

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    If you are flexible, you can do that trip with a private pilot license, no instrument rating, in a plane without so much as an attitude indicator, much less FIKI. Every added capability only really makes your decision making more complex.

    PPL, VFR only: It’s IFR, I will wait.

    Instrument rating: It’s IFR, let’s try to figure out if there will be convective storms and/or icing and, if so, how I can avoid it. Maybe I should wait.

    FIKI: There’s icing, but how much and what are my escape routes once it starts to accumulate?

    These complications in the decision making process come with the ability to fly in more weather than you could otherwise. But not in all weather. And a lot of the borderline decisions will be easier to make (and to escape when you get them wrong) when you have more experience. So you still must err on the side of caution while you gain that experience the easy way (by not dying from getting things wrong).

    I would suggest doing the trip once VFR-only when you are at your most flexible and then fine tuning how this trip fits into your overall flying mission. That will help you choose a plane and focus your energy on or away from getting your instrument rating.
     
  8. benyflyguy

    benyflyguy En-Route PoA Supporter

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    My buddy does this in a Lance yearly VFR. NePA to FL. He is flexible with timing that is all.
     
  9. Bill Watson

    Bill Watson En-Route

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    Well said.

    In terms of selecting an aircraft, you are going to pick a plane that lies somewhere on the continuum of simplicity and complexity, cost and capability, availability, serviceability, etc. Then you need to plan and fly accordingly. There’s something to be said for starting at the lower end and moving towards the higher end as your ability and knowledge grows so you can pick the right options.

    You’ve already made some decisions; single engine, fixed gear, high performance, normally aspirated. For the mission you described I say it’s about the perfect spot. I started flying a similar mission with slightly less capability (no big engine, VFR). I’m now flying an RV10 and still fly that mission (live south, flying north regularly, IFR, no anti-ice). I easily achieve 99% dispatch success on any given trip-day except for the icing season when a bit more flexibility is required. I can always make the round trip north when needed but dispatch success is best described for any trip-week.

    It’s actually amazing how often icing situations can be overcome with experience, caution and flexibility. But occasionally you just have to punt. With that said, servicing and maintaining an anti-ice capability has a cost.

    There’s nothing more fun than flying with a mission!

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
     
  10. donjohnston

    donjohnston Pattern Altitude

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    Flew out of the Chicago area for 15 years with a 182-RG. In that time, I only cancelled 2 or 3 flights. A bunch of other flights got moved up or back and we spent some nights short of home (Bloomington, IN was an often used RON spot. Flexibility is the key.