172 Crash near KFWN (Sussex County)

Discussion in 'Aviation Mishaps' started by Trogdor, Nov 12, 2021.

  1. Mikey B

    Mikey B Pre-Flight

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    I only watched part of the video, and with the sound off (arguably the least painful way to watch Gryder), so he may have addressed this, but as a one-time skydiver I have to ask WHAT KIND OF IDIOT JUMPS WITHOUT A HELMET?!
     
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  2. AKBill

    AKBill En-Route

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    The one in the video..:rolleyes:
     
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  3. Kenny Phillips

    Kenny Phillips En-Route

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    Perhaps the guy who rode his motorcycle to the airport, sans helmet. Freedom!
     
  4. Lachlan

    Lachlan En-Route

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    What would you put a helmet on an empty Tupperware bowl?
     
  5. Albany Tom

    Albany Tom Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    Somebody that doesn't care, for whatever reason.
     
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  6. mryan75

    mryan75 Cleared for Takeoff

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    I don’t know, man, I’ve seen a lot of accidents where you swear the PIC was giving an Oscars acceptance speech. Some people do nothing BUT talk on the radio in an emergency.
     
  7. Sluggo63

    Sluggo63 Cleared for Takeoff

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    “The perso
    “The person who thinks his brain isn’t important enough to protect with a helmet is correct.”

    ~Confucius (probably)
     
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  8. MarcP

    MarcP Filing Flight Plan

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    Looks like preliminary report is up. Doesn't shed much light on the accident yet:

    On November 11, 2021, about 1048 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N90559, was
    destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Branchville, New Jersey. The flight
    instructor and a private pilot receiving instruction were fatally injured. The airplane was
    operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.
    Preliminary flight track data was obtained from OpsVue, a commercially available web-based
    product that geo-reference’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) data sources. Review of
    the flight track data revealed the airplane departed from Essex County Airport (CDW),
    Caldwell, New Jersey about 1030 and flew predominately in a northwesterly direction as it
    climbed. The airplane reached an altitude of about 6,400 ft mean sea level, before entering a
    steep descending left turn that continued until the flight track data was lost.
    The airplane came to rest oriented on a magnetic heading of 330° in a wooded area. All major
    components of the airplane were located at the accident site. The fuselage from the firewall to
    the empennage was crushed and impact damaged. The instrument panel and cockpit were
    destroyed by impact forces. Both wings remained partially attached to the fuselage, and the
    ailerons and flaps were impact damaged. Flight control cable continuity was observed from the
    primary flight control surfaces to the cockpit controls. The horizontal stabilizers and vertical
    stabilizer remained attached to the empennage but displayed damage consistent with impact.
    The left and right elevators remained partially attached to their respective horizontal stabilizers
    and the rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer, all displayed impact damage.
    Initial examination of the engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or
    failures that would have precluded normal operation. The propeller remained attached to the
    engine crankshaft flange and displayed chordwise scoring and aft bending. Several trees and
    tree branches near the accident site exhibited fresh cuts consistent with propeller strikes.
    The airplane was recovered and retained for further examination.
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. Ed Haywood

    Ed Haywood Line Up and Wait

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    Does somewhat rule out in-flight structural failure. At least nothing obvious fell off the plane in flight.

    Interesting that the engine was running. In some common aerobatic aircraft, engine power may prevent spin recovery by flattening the spin. Emergency spin recovery training usually emphasizes verifying throttle completely off. But a C172? Geez, that is so hard to spin and so easy to recover. Maybe if the CG was way out of limits to the rear, but hard to see how that would be physically possible with rear seats empty.
     
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  10. Pilawt

    Pilawt Final Approach

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    Carbon monoxide?
     
  11. Vadim

    Vadim Filing Flight Plan

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    They don't say at what attitude the "flight track data was lost". From flightradar24 and flightaware it looked like it was lost almost immediately. It sounds like they have more data than that, but not clear how much more.

    How long does it usually take for next step (weeks, months, year) ?
     
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  12. 455 Bravo Uniform

    455 Bravo Uniform En-Route

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    Is it a given that the engine was running? If there was no engine breakage, on or off, the prop might have been windmilling from the high speed “fall” out of the sky, though that could/would need the nose to be pointed into the relative wind (“ahead” and mostly pointed down)?
     
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  13. John Alex64

    John Alex64 Filing Flight Plan

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    NTSB usually says 12 to 18 months to complete an investigation...
     
  14. John Alex64

    John Alex64 Filing Flight Plan

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    The preliminary info that we have at this point, is very limited. So it’s hard to try to figure out what happened.
    A 172 is so docile, WHEN you can get it to spin, and recovery is extremely easy on that aircraft. In fact, very often a 172 will nearly correct itself out of a spin! I’d be interested in knowing more about the pilots experience, and more about the schools training at this preliminary stage.
    Is it a good school? Competent instructors that really train students to fly? Of more one of those schools where aspiring pilots basically “buy” their certificate?
    I’m not at this point suggesting that’s the case, but sadly, most of us pilots that have been around a while, have known of many schools that push students through quickly. Especially students with large bank accounts.
    Where other flight schools actually take the time, and demand you’re up to speed before trying to simply progress quickly through certificate and ratings... I have no knowledge of this schools training...
     
  15. John Alex64

    John Alex64 Filing Flight Plan

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    Exactly... Calling “Mayday” is the last thing any experienced, competent pilot is going to do. Number one? Fly the aircraft.
    It seems these days that I see and hear new, young pilots all the time, talking about how “quickly” an emergency should be declared, or a “Mayday” called out. Back when I learned to fly, (40 years ago), it was always stressed, that the last thing you do is get on the radio! As PIC, it’s your responsibility to fly the aircraft, and safely get it down. AND BTW, there’s little to nothing that controller who’s sipping his coffee at a radar screen can do for you, when your hard IFR, sweating bullets in turbulence, hand flying a light aircraft, or have an aircraft problem in the air. That’s your responsibility as PIC, not any controllers job. And controllers are not pilots...
     
  16. LesGawlik

    LesGawlik Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Disagree. It depends on what's wrong, but I want to declare ASAP. I can fly the airplane with my thumb on the switch. I almost always get FF, and they will tag me up with an emergency code right away. If I lose altitude, that may not happen. At least someone will know where to look for the hole in the ground. In IMC, ATC might have tops reports indicating a climb could put you in VMC, or get you out of turbulence. ATC is a resource to be used. There is no benefit from great oratory, except perhaps to relieve the pilot's tension. But am I going to call? You bet, if at all possible.
     
  17. MICHAEL MAHN

    MICHAEL MAHN Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Speaking of which, I watch accident videos like this to learn, but frankly, I find the audio of a pilot's final communications exceptionally unsettling. The link I provided is the one that really got to me. You can hear the desperation in the pilot's voice and the apparent realization he would likely not survive. His final "keep talking to me" plea, to me, sounded less about requesting ATC assistance and more about wanting human contact.
     
  18. DogoPilot

    DogoPilot Pre-Flight

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    That's a tough one to watch. What I can't get my head around is what made him break off the first approach, twice at exactly the same spot both times. The approach looked perfect before he did that on both attempts. I know he said his GPS wasn't working but that doesn't explain the fact that the approach was perfect up to that point.
     
  19. labbadabba

    labbadabba Pattern Altitude

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    So, I just learned about this today, well, I had heard about the crash but didn't realize it was Tom Fisher. Tom was the guy who really taught me to fly nearly 10 years ago, I can't say enough about his excellence as a mentor and as a pilot.

    A few years ago his school went part141 and his instructors and maintenance were all top notch. He is the second CFI I've had who has now been killed. The other was this: http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2017/08/piper-pa-30-twin-comanche-n22hw-fatal.html

    I gotta say, it's very spooky...